Like one Buffy Summers, and many NY-ers and vampire slayers before me, I don’t drive. I took Driver’s Ed in high school and blame my inability to drive a car on the fact that the teacher played Rush Limbaugh during my lessons. You should all thank your lucky stars I’m not on the road; I’m a terrible driver. I’m high-strung as hell and I don’t belong in a car.

That said, Bookmobiles are really freaking cool. I like the idea of a movable library, there to reach patrons who can’t get to one for whatever reason. I, personally, would like you to drive me around in a mint-colored Winnebago filled with comic books and zines.

Tumblr is a dangerous place, with misquoted books (seriously, no one seems to know the difference between Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan) and Hot Topic-ed co-eds as far as the eye can see. You’re lucky you have me to guide you through that hot mess.

Topeka, Kansas got its first bookmobile in 1943.

Bookmobile in Haiti.

If you can manage the translation, you can find more about this bookmobile here.

1949 Bookmobile from Anderson, South Carolina.

The Delta Sigma Theta bookmobile in front of the King St. Branch Library of of the West Georgia Regional Library in Carrollton, GA.

Click here to read more on this fascinating bookmobile. 

Atlantic County Library System’s bookmobile at Nesco in 1950.

Raul Lemesoff converted a 1979 Ford Falcon into an open air bookmobile. He drives it around Buenos Aires, offering books to anyone who wants them. The Weapon of Mass Instruction, as Lemesoff calls it, promotes “peace through literature.” Lemesoff has already driven it to remote regions of Argentina and hopes to expand the project into other nations.

(blurb via Neatorama)

THIS IS CLEARLY THE COOLEST ONE EVER. Gerstenslager Co., Wooster, Ohio, suburban and trailer.

Via a 1961 Girl Scouts Calender

Late 1970s Canadian bookmobile.

The girl in the white dress is totally on point.

I love you Baltimore!

Via the Enoch Pratt Free Library’s Flickr: “1945 Photograph of the Enoch Pratt Free Library book wagon during a visit to the 1000 block Dallas Street in Baltimore, Maryland. An African American boy, standing at the head of the horse attached to the book wagon, reads a book held in his one hand while holding the horse’s bridle with his other hand.”

1950s Kentucky Bookmobile

And that’s all I have to say about that.

~Love and Libraries, Ingrid

About magpielibrarian

Youth Services Librarian, Mediocre Crafter, Urban Magpie, Glitter Addict, and Worshiper of Ridiculous Outfits, Emerging Leader 2012, Former Rainbow Book List Member, and GLBT RT Director-at-Large! This is what a librarian looks like, kids.

4 responses »

  1. Jo says:

    I totally want that 1949 bookmobile for myself … so cool. Nice photos!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s